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Arayori (A Peasant Woman)
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Arayori (A Peasant Woman)


Description Conservation Exhibitions Provenance Credit
Description Like many of their contemporaries, William and Henry Walters were intrigued by the precise and intricate workmanship found in East Asian decorative arts. Henry Walters expanded on his father's interest by collecting contemporary Japanese artists' works, which emerged as that country modernized at the beginning of the 20th century. He acquired this sculpture in 1915, when he traveled west to visit the Panama-Pacific Exposition, a World's Fair held in San Francisco. The Tokyo-based artist Yoshida Hōmei was awarded one of two gold medals for sculpture by the Japanese pavilion's organizing committee. The sculptor's work reveals an idealizing nostalgia for rural life following a period of rapid modernization and aggressive international engagement by his home country.
Conservation
Date Description Narrative
5/09/2014Treatmentcleaned; examined for exhibition; inpainted
Exhibitions
  • From Rye to Raphael: The Walters Story. The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore. 2014-2016.
Provenance The Panama-Pacific International Exhibition, San Francisco, 1915; Henry Walters, Baltimore, 1915 [mode of acquisition unknown]; Walters Art Museum, 1931, by bequest.
Credit Acquired by Henry Walters, 1915

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Period
ca. 1915 (Taisho)
Medium
wood with applied color
(Sculpture)
Accession Number
25.2
Measurements
H: 52 3/8 × W: 21 × D: 24 in. (133 × 53.3 × 61 cm)
Geographies
  • Japan (Place of Origin)

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