Results 1 308
3 Previous Next

Achala-Chandamaharoshana and Dveshavajri
Explore Object
Creative Commons License

Achala-Chandamaharoshana and Dveshavajri


Description Exhibitions Provenance Inscription Credit
Description The Buddhist meditational deity Achala ("Immovable"), also known as Chandamaharoshana ("Fierce and Great Wrath"), kneels as he unites with his female partner, Dveshavajri ("Indestructible Fury"). Together, they forcefully destroy obstacles to enlightenment: With his sword, Achala cuts through ignorance, and with his lasso he reins in and subdues negative forces. Dveshavajri’s curved flaying knife strips away the layers of delusion that obstruct true reality, and her skull cup symbolizes the emptiness perceived through pure mental clarity. Both all-seeing deities have three eyes; with his, Achala looks in three different directions: Gazing upward with his right eye, he destroys Mara, lord of death, and the demons of the heavens. Gazing downward with his left eye, he destroys dangerous serpents and demons of the earth. His central eye looks straight forward, obliterating all other obstacles.
Exhibitions
  • Desire and Devotion: Art from India, Nepal, and Tibet in the John and Berthe Ford Collection. The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore; Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Santa Barbara; Albuquerque Museum, Albuquerque; Birmingham Museum of Art, Birmingham; Hong Kong Museum of Art, Hong Kong. 2001-2003.
Provenance Sale, Sotheby's, New York, December 1973; John and Berthe Ford, Baltimore, 1973, by purchase.
Inscriptions Inscr. (date effaced)
Credit Promised gift of John and Berthe Ford

Download Image Add to Collection Creative Commons License

Creator
Period
16th century
Medium
opaque watercolor on cotton
(Painting & Drawing)
Accession Number
F.138
Measurements
H: 32 1/4 x W: 23 in. (81.9 x 58.4 cm)
Geographies
  • Nepal (Place of Origin)
Location Within Museum
Not On View

Tags


    Thumbnail: Achala-Chandamaharoshana and Dveshavajri
    Zoom Out Zoom In Back to Details  
    Full Size: Achala-Chandamaharoshana and Dveshavajri