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Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius
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Equestrian Statue of Marcus Aurelius

Description Conservation Exhibitions Provenance Credit
Description This is a reduction of the monumental statue on the Capitoline Hill, Rome, dedicated in AD 176- the only equestrian statue from antiquity to have survived. It escaped being melted down for cannon because it was thought to represent Constantine, the first Christian emperor. In the early 1500s, the rider was correctly re-identified as the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius (reigned 161-180), particularly respected by humanists for his philosophical writings on ethics. Although the first reduction of this important public statue was made in 1465 (for the study of the Florentine patron and collector Piero de' Medici), this one can be dated to after 1564, when the marble base reproduced here (designed by Michelangelo) was put in place.
Date Description Narrative
5/01/1948Treatmentcleaned; coated
8/24/1977Treatmentcleaned; coated; loss compensation
3/30/1981Loan Considerationexamined for loan
12/17/1987Treatmentcleaned; coated; loss compensation
12/17/1987Examinationexamined for condition
  • World of Wonder. The Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore. 1971-1972.
  • The Allure of Bronze. The Walters Art Gallery, Baltimore. 1995.
  • Untamed: The Art of Antoine-Louis Barye. The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore; Philbrook Museum of Art, Tulsa; The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum, Palm Beach. 2007-2008.
Provenance Henry Walters, Baltimore [date and mode of acquisition unknown]; Walters Art Museum, 1931, by bequest.
Credit Acquired by Henry Walters

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ca. 1565-1585 (Renaissance)
gilt on bronze, marble base, garnet
Accession Number
H: 13 9/16 in. (34.5 cm); H with base: 21 in. (53.3 cm)


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