Results 1 1032
814 Previous Next

Shu
Additional Views Explore Object
Creative Commons License

Shu


Description Conservation Provenance Credit
Description Shu, the son of the creator and sun god in the Heliopolitan creation myth, represents the principle of air. Together with his consort, Tefnut- the principle of moisture, as well as Geb (earth) and Nut (sky), he was one of the first deities. Shu was responsible for separating Geb and Nut and securing the space of the universe; therefore he also represented the life principle. Amulets of Shu became popular in the Late Period. This amulet represents Shu in his standardized form. He is kneeling on his right knee with his left knee drawn up. Both arms are raised (to lift up the sky), and he wears a long wig and a pleated kilt.
Conservation
Date Description Narrative
7/23/1959Treatmentcleaned
4/20/1977Treatmentcleaned
7/30/1998Examinationexamined for condition
Provenance Henry Walters, Baltimore [date and mode of acquisition unknown]; Walters Art Museum, 1931, by bequest.
Credit Acquired by Henry Walters

Download Image Add to Collection Creative Commons License

Creator
Period
ca. 664-343 BCE (Late Period, 26th-30th dynasty)
Medium
Egyptian faience with pale blue glaze
(Ceramics)
Accession Number
48.1683
Measurements
H: 1 1/4 x W: 11/16 x D: 9/16 in. (3.2 x 1.75 x 1.5 cm)
Geographies
  • Egypt (Place of Origin)

Tags


    Thumbnail: Shu Thumbnail: Shu Thumbnail: Shu Thumbnail: Shu Thumbnail: Shu
    Zoom Out Zoom In Back to Details  
    Full Size: Shu