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Dish with Kakiemon Enamels
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Dish with Kakiemon Enamels


Description Provenance Inscription Credit
Description Porcelain was first produced in the Arita kilns, Hizen Province, Japan, in the early 17th century. According to tradition, the technique of decorating porcelain with overglaze enamels was revealed to Sakaida Kakiemon, the earliest member of a family of potters, by a Chinese official in 1646. Characteristic of the wares associated with the Kakiemon family is this dish with its plum tree, banded hedge, floral and "hoho" bird decorations in brialliant red, green and blue enamels. Such wares were exported to Europe from about 1670-1690 by the Dutch East India Company. On the reverse of this dish is incised "N 7" with a rectangle, the mark for Japanese wares in the collection of Frederick Augustus I (1690-1733), Elector of Saxony and King of Poland.
Provenance Collection of Frederick Augustus I [1690-1733], Elector of Saxony and King of Poland (?). Acquired by William T. or Henry Walters, Baltimore; by bequest to Walters Art Museum, 1931.
Inscriptions [Inscription] On back, incised: N 7
Credit Acquired by William T. or Henry Walters

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Creator
Period
late 17th century (early Edo)
Medium
porcelain with enamels
(Ceramics)
Accession Number
49.1284
Measurements
H: 1 1/2 × Diam: 6 3/8 in. (3.8 × 16.2 cm)
Geographies
  • Japan (Place of Origin)
Location Within Museum
Not On View

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