Results 1 2995
505 Previous Next

Chocolate Pot
Additional Views Explore Object
Creative Commons License

Chocolate Pot


Description Provenance Inscription Credit
Description Indigenous peoples in the Americas consumed products made from cacao beans and fruit as early as 1900 BCE. In the early 16th century, Spanish friars brought cacao from newly established colonies in South and Central America and introduced chocolate to the wealthy elite of Europe. Chocolate pots like this one were among the new types of tableware created to accommodate this luxurious hot beverage. The handle of this pot is made of ivory, which would have prevented the user from burning his or her hand. The portside scenes painted on this chocolate pot make reference to the overseas trade that brought commodities like chocolate and sugar to Europe. They do not, however, allude to the forced labor of indigenous people and enslaved Africans that enabled the trade.
Provenance Acquired by Henry Walters, Baltimore; Walters Art Museum, 1931, by bequest.
Inscriptions [Mark] Crossed swords in blue; [Mark] On cover in gold: 28
Credit Acquired by Henry Walters

Download Image Add to Collection Creative Commons License

Period
ca. 1725
Medium
hard paste porcelain painted with colored enamels with overglaze enamels, gilding, ivory, and wood
(Ceramics)
Accession Number
48.911
Measurements
Overall with lid: H: 6 7/16 in. (16.4 cm)
Geographies
Location Within Museum
Not On View

Tags


    Thumbnail: Chocolate Pot Thumbnail: Chocolate Pot Thumbnail: Chocolate Pot Thumbnail: Chocolate Pot Thumbnail: Chocolate Pot
    Thumbnail: Chocolate Pot Thumbnail: Chocolate Pot
    Previous Next
    Zoom Out Zoom In Back to Details  
    Full Size: Chocolate Pot