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Herakles and Iolaos fighting the Lernaean Hydra
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Herakles and Iolaos fighting the Lernaean Hydra


Description Conservation Exhibitions Provenance Credit
Description The Hydra was a multi-headed snake-monster raised by the goddess Hera that lived in the swamps near Lerna. Up to fifty heads are reported for the creature in ancient sources, but it usually is depicted with fewer, as on this vase. Herakles, accompanied by his nephew Iolaos, killed this menace as the second of the Labors he had to perform for king Eurystheus. Herakles' lion skin protected him from the snake's venom, which he later used to make his arrows poisonous.
Conservation
Date Description Narrative
8/07/1984Loan Considerationexamined for loan
7/27/1987Treatmentx-ray
10/20/2005Treatmentloss compensation; stabilized
Exhibitions
  • Heroes: Mortals and Myths in Ancient Greece. The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore; Frist Center for the Visual Arts, Nashville; San Diego Museum Of Art, San Diego; Alexander S. Onassis Public Benefit Foundation (USA), New York. 2009-2011.
Provenance Joseph Brummer, New York [date and mode of acquisition unknown]; Henry Walters, Baltimore, 1924, by purchase; Walters Art Museum, 1931, by bequest.
Credit Acquired by Henry Walters, 1924

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Period
ca. 500 BC (Archaic)
Medium
terracotta
(Ceramics)
Accession Number
48.227
Measurements
H: 6 15/16 x Diam: 2 11/16 in. (17.7 x 6.9 cm)
Geographies
Location Within Museum
Not On View

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